ppaction
ppaction:

tessagratton:

ppaction:

Queer Chicana feminist writer Gloria Anzaldúa was born 71 years ago today. As an activist and theorist, she pioneered ideas of intersectionality, feminism, queer theory, cultural theory, language, and more.
Happy birthday, Gloria!
via Latinos for Planned Parenthood

My favorite poet, and my favorite feminist - though it’s weird to realize I have a “favorite feminist.” Go read her stuff. 
I remember when she died I was ridiculously sad that I’d never met her, that she’d never read anything I wrote and know how much she inspired me to think about language and queer feminism and poetry and racism. 
I quote her more than I quote Shakespeare. 

Reblogging for the comment. Love this. 

ppaction:

tessagratton:

ppaction:

Queer Chicana feminist writer Gloria Anzaldúa was born 71 years ago today. As an activist and theorist, she pioneered ideas of intersectionality, feminism, queer theory, cultural theory, language, and more.

Happy birthday, Gloria!

via Latinos for Planned Parenthood

My favorite poet, and my favorite feminist - though it’s weird to realize I have a “favorite feminist.” Go read her stuff. 

I remember when she died I was ridiculously sad that I’d never met her, that she’d never read anything I wrote and know how much she inspired me to think about language and queer feminism and poetry and racism. 

I quote her more than I quote Shakespeare. 

Reblogging for the comment. Love this. 

socialistchampagne

tractionism:

Over the last week or so in Australia a boy with dark skin was threatened with beheading, a woman had her head smashed against a wall and was thrown off a train, mosques and cars have been vandalised, people are being abused in the street and social media is littered with hate speech and vile comments. Kind of interesting considering most of these people justify their attacks by linking Islam to terrorism and proclaiming it’s a hateful religion from violent countries. 

lgbtqblogs
lgbtqblogs:

A gay couple looking to find a flat share in London got a shock when they were turned down by prospective flatmates for not being “a regular couple”.
George Poole, and his boyfriend tweeted a screenshot of the brief exchange which took place after they enquired about a flat share.
In response the received the message: “Hi guys, sorry but we are looking for a regular couple. Thanks for understanding.”
Poole tweeted his disbelief at the response, but not before firing back: “FYI we are a regular couple. Homosexuality is not irregular! Thanks for being ignorant.”
The image of the text messages was retweeted by British gold-medal winning Olympian Greg Rutherford, who said: “A friend of my GF is moving to London. He’s gay. He, with his boyfriend, enquired about a house share. The response?”
Discriminating against a couple in such a way could be in breach of the sexual orientation regulation of Equality Act.
Poole also later tweeted: “Finding accommodation in LDN is more stressful than it should be. Someone pass me the port.”

lgbtqblogs:

A gay couple looking to find a flat share in London got a shock when they were turned down by prospective flatmates for not being “a regular couple”.

George Poole, and his boyfriend tweeted a screenshot of the brief exchange which took place after they enquired about a flat share.

In response the received the message: “Hi guys, sorry but we are looking for a regular couple. Thanks for understanding.”

Poole tweeted his disbelief at the response, but not before firing back: “FYI we are a regular couple. Homosexuality is not irregular! Thanks for being ignorant.”

The image of the text messages was retweeted by British gold-medal winning Olympian Greg Rutherford, who said: “A friend of my GF is moving to London. He’s gay. He, with his boyfriend, enquired about a house share. The response?”

Discriminating against a couple in such a way could be in breach of the sexual orientation regulation of Equality Act.

Poole also later tweeted: “Finding accommodation in LDN is more stressful than it should be. Someone pass me the port.”

lgbtqblogs

That’s probably why I get so irritated by people who react to the church’s targeting and firing of LGBT Catholics and allies with a shrug, a sneer, or a dismissive, self-righteous comment like “what did they expect?”. Unless you’ve gone through it yourself, you have no idea what a shattering, life-altering, demoralizing, and humiliating experience it is. “What did they expect?” is victim-blaming, pure and simple, and the absolute worst way to respond when a person is suffering.

Just as maddening as “what did they expect?” is the other response that people always seem to have to the gay Catholic musician, lesbian Catholic school teacher, or church worker with an LGBT child: “why do they belong to an organization that hates them?” This response is completely masturbatory: it makes the person saying it feel good about themselves for what they perceive to be their superior state of enlightenment, but doesn’t actually accomplish much else.

Instead of acknowledging the victim’s unjust suffering and offering sympathy and support, this response shames them for being in a spiritual place that’s different from one’s own. It’s also profoundly unhelpful, unless one believes that only certain LGBT people, in certain religious communities and faith traditions, deserve justice and basic human dignity.