yvettew
cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

one-for-the-bad-blood

one-for-the-bad-blood:

1. I have SUCH a girlcrush on Jennifer Lawrence. *looks at me, winks*
Girls are attractive. You like to look at them sometimes. I like to make out with them sometimes. This is because, as previously mentioned, girls are attractive. It doesn’t mean that we get to wink at each other, or that we…

bellepommedeterre

You ask me how I could love her.

How I could love her when there were so many things in life I was giving up by choosing her.
A life of normality and financial security. A life where I offended no one and never had to look over my shoulder or worry about being disowned.

You ask me how I could choose her.

Over living the life of a woman completely provided for. A life where I want and need nothing. A life I could live in the open without guilt. You tell me “if it wasn’t wrong you wouldn’t keep it a secret”.

I think of her lips. Her arms. Her hips.

I think of the softness of her kiss and the warmth of her embrace, and her body pressed against me and my heart begins to race and - oh god, if there’s a god, I know he put me here for her. Just a single look and she captured my soul forever.

I think of her heart. Her whispers. Her smiles. Her giggles.

How I wrap her in my arms. What she looks like when she cries and how it makes me ache inside. How her hair curls in the morning, and all the ways she says she loves me.

And I ask, how could I not?

a.c.g. - “How could I not?” (via bellepommedeterre)